Of course this gardener is ‘getting ready for spring.’ He never stopped.

Spring is the short, simple title we give to the complex and drawn-out awakening of the natural world after winter dormancy. We declare the season underway next week, but the natural stirring has been going on for some time, although probably unnoticed unless you grow camellias or witch hazels or keep honeybees. The process of […] […]

Do’s and don’ts for early spring gardening

“A warm day in March can inspire a kind of madness in gardeners. It can cause them to burst out the door, desperate after months cooped up by cold and snow, and start work way too soon. “Be careful what you do right now,” said Sharon Yiesla, plant knowledge specialist at the Morton Arboretum in […] […]

Best apps for gardening and yard work for spring 2019

“Not everyone has a green thumb or an eye for landscaping. Some people don’t even get to try because they’re so busy. Others watch HGTV over and over again and still never achieve the yard of their dreams because it’s easy to forget most of what you learned by the time you get outside. But […] […]

Stackable pottery that helps you turn your household food waste into fresh produce. [KICKSTARTER]

Compottery is a simple solution for reducing household food waste while growing fresh produce. This happens through a process called Vermicomposting. What is Vermicomposting? Vermicomposting is the process of transforming organic waste into fertil… […]

How urban agriculture could improve food security in U.S. cities

During the partial federal shutdown in December and January, news reports showed furloughed government workers standing in line for donated meals. These images were reminders that for an estimated one out of eight Americans, food insecurity is a near-term risk. In California, where I teach, 80 percent of the population lives in cities. Feeding the […] […]

How urban agriculture could improve food security in U.S. cities

During the partial federal shutdown in December and January, news reports showed furloughed government workers standing in line for donated meals. These images were reminders that for an estimated one out of eight Americans, food insecurity is a near-term risk. In California, where I teach, 80 percent of the population lives in cities. Feeding the […] […]

Urban agriculture may uproot traditional farms in world of food ethics

Family-owned farms are decreasing as community gardens and urban agriculture find their footing in a world of food ethics. In Arizona, it is not atypical to see farmland sold for urban development. Arcadia, a neighborhood located 10 miles from ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus, was originally known for its citrus groves before the land was sold […] […]

Urban agriculture may uproot traditional farms in world of food ethics

Family-owned farms are decreasing as community gardens and urban agriculture find their footing in a world of food ethics. In Arizona, it is not atypical to see farmland sold for urban development. Arcadia, a neighborhood located 10 miles from ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus, was originally known for its citrus groves before the land was sold […] […]

Urban gardens: Healthy or harmful?

Home-grown vegetables are only as good as their soil and environment. For urban gardeners, that can be a challenge. “In food deserts and other areas where people don’t have access to food, they take matters into their own hands through urban gardening,” said Ahkinyala Cobb-Abdullah, an associate professor of environmental science and ecology at Virginia […] […]

Urban gardens: Healthy or harmful?

Home-grown vegetables are only as good as their soil and environment. For urban gardeners, that can be a challenge. “In food deserts and other areas where people don’t have access to food, they take matters into their own hands through urban gardening,” said Ahkinyala Cobb-Abdullah, an associate professor of environmental science and ecology at Virginia […] […]