Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

Most people out there are now aware of the meaning of holistic lawn care and holistic weed control, nonetheless, for the few ones who may still find it a bit difficult to understand, holistic weed control is the control of weed organically, naturally or without the use of any harmful chemicals. Organic weed control comes with a number of benefits which include the safety of the household and the environment as a whole.

Holistic lawn care is quickly growing into a trend for big companies and home owners who are beginning to understand the repercussions of using chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Tests have continued to show that chemicals have dire consequences. These chemicals are harmful to our children, our pets and the environment as a whole especially when used for long periods of time. Continue reading Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

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EPA Fails To Follow Landmark Law To Protect Children From Pesticides in Food

WASHINGTON – The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children’s health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. But an investigation by EWG, published this week in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, found that the EPA has failed to add the mandated children’s health safety factor to the allowable limits for almost 90 percent of the most common pesticides.

The study in Environmental Health examined the EPA’s risk assessments for 47 non-organophosphate pesticides since 2011, including those most commonly found on fresh fruits and vegetables, and found that the required additional tenfold safety factor was applied in only five cases.

“Given the potential health hazards of pesticides in our food, it is disturbing that the EPA has largely ignored the law’s requirement to ensure adequate protection for children,” said the study’s author, Olga Naidenko, Ph.D., vice president for science investigations at EWG. “The added safety factor is essential to protect children from pesticides that can cause harm to the nervous system, hormonal disruption and cancer.”

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.ewg.org/release/ewg-study-epa-fails-follow-landmark-law-protect-children-pesticides-food?fbclid=IwAR0w3GKoZggVdN3fLSfp9Ysx0qFaFF5LkhqAnCVZjZJqweBHsH2bxx-GJ3w

Bees Love Cannabis! Researchers Discover Hemp Could Help Restore Bee Populations

Hemp attracts bees in droves, a new study finds.

Researchers tested several strains and found bees – both wild and domestic – love them all, especially the taller varieties.

It’s an unusual finding considering cannabis doesn’t possess the sweet nectar or bright colors typical of flowers that attract pollinators.

The researchers speculate it’s something to do with the plentiful pollen found in hemp flowers.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://returntonow.net/2020/02/11/bees-love-hemp-study/

Jane Goodall Plans to Plant 5 Million Trees in 2020

Joining the effort to reforest the planet, Jane Goodall commits to planting 5 millions trees by the end of the year. 

Jane Goodall, known for saving the chimpanzees, is now on a similar mission to save our forests.

The famed primatologists’ Roots & Shoots program connects young people across 60 counties in an effort to reforest the planet.

The organization has committed to planting over 5 million new trees this year alone.

The group has a larger goal of planting a trillion trees in the next 10 years, as part of a joint effort with the United Nations’ 1 Trillion Trees Campaign.

“Now is the time for everyone on the planet to do their part.” Goodall said in a statement.

The World Bank estimates we’ve lost almost 4 million square miles of forest since the start of the 20th century.

Whether it’s clear cutting for agriculture, mining, cattle gazing, or wood products, one thing is clear, we’re losing about 1,000 football fields of forest every hour.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://returntonow.net/2020/02/12/jane-goodall-plans-to-plant-5-million-trees-in-2020/?fbclid=IwAR2eLLMqRZq2Iaozl6bN3UGHMM_KIdEfpHX3GuSsjc14nTIPpSQUMYbRiYQ

Jane Goodall Plans to Plant 5 Million Trees in 2020

Joining the effort to reforest the planet, Jane Goodall commits to planting 5 millions trees by the end of the year. 

Jane Goodall, known for saving the chimpanzees, is now on a similar mission to save our forests.

The famed primatologists’ Roots & Shoots program connects young people across 60 counties in an effort to reforest the planet.

The organization has committed to planting over 5 million new trees this year alone.

The group has a larger goal of planting a trillion trees in the next 10 years, as part of a joint effort with the United Nations’ 1 Trillion Trees Campaign.

“Now is the time for everyone on the planet to do their part.” Goodall said in a statement.

The World Bank estimates we’ve lost almost 4 million square miles of forest since the start of the 20th century.

Whether it’s clear cutting for agriculture, mining, cattle gazing, or wood products, one thing is clear, we’re losing about 1,000 football fields of forest every hour.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://returntonow.net/2020/02/12/jane-goodall-plans-to-plant-5-million-trees-in-2020/?fbclid=IwAR2eLLMqRZq2Iaozl6bN3UGHMM_KIdEfpHX3GuSsjc14nTIPpSQUMYbRiYQ

Three maps tell the story of urban farming in Philly right now

Hundreds of Philadelphians grow their own food on city land. African and Southeast Asian immigrants cultivate African eggplant and Thai roselle in South Philadelphia. Mexican immigrants and Puerto Ricans grow jalapeños and gandules in Kensington. In neighborhoods across the city, some 418 edible gardens bloom across 500 parcels.

But these spaces face an uncertain future as development pressures encroach.

The areas where many of the edible gardens cluster — South and West Philadelphia and Kensington — are gentrifying fast and growers find themselves facing eviction from land no one else wanted until now.

As the city moves forward with a first-ever Philadelphia Urban Agriculture Plan, three maps created by Interface Studio, with data gathered by Interface and partners at Soil Generation, tell the story of where Philly’s urban farmers are now and where they may be in the future.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT: https://whyy.org/articles/3-maps-tell-the-story-of-urban-farming-in-philly-right-now/

Lessons Learned from My Year-Long 100% Homegrown and Foraged Food Challenge

It’s the dream of millions of people: To live off the land and to never need to make a trip to the grocery store. But for nearly everyone with that dream, it’s just that — a dream. Our current global, industrial food system is just too convenient and easy to resist. Our modern lives are too busy and monetized to go that far back to the land.

I’ve been exploring food for nearly a decade and since the beginning, I’ve had the burning question: Would it be possible to produce 100% of my own food in the times we live in? Could I exist without grocery stores and restaurants? Nothing packaged or processed? Nothing shipped from far-off lands? Could I grow and forage everything I ate for an entire year?

That’s the question that I set out to answer just over a year ago. One big thing though: I didn’t have a farm or even a house with a front yard. All I had was a backpack and I didn’t have much growing experience, either. You could say I was jumping off the deep end.

I chose to do this in Florida for the year-round growing season and the local “grow-your-own” movement I had stumbled across while traveling through a few years prior. I quickly got to work, meeting people in my neighborhood and proposing that I turn their lawns into gardens. It wasn’t hard to find takers. I’d cover all the costs, do pretty much all the work and they could eat as much food as they’d like. What’s not to love about that deal?

READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT: https://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/homegrown-and-foraged-food-challenge-zbcz1912?fbclid=IwAR3bXhVBZLu5Hhqm6DdhAc7Bb5SsSuUNtXdsiFGbmt29_2o9vphf3pmRZY0

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy

Prozac may not be the only way to get rid of your serious blues. Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain and are without side effects and chemical dependency potential. Learn how to harness the natural antidepressant in soil and make yourself happier and healthier.

Natural remedies have been around for untold centuries. These natural remedies included cures for almost any physical ailment as well as mental and emotional afflictions. Ancient healers may not have known why something worked but simply that it did. Modern scientists have unraveled the why of many medicinal plants and practices but only recently are they finding remedies that were previously unknown and yet, still a part of the natural life cycle. Soil microbes and human health now have a positive link that has been studied and found to be verifiable.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/antidepressant-microbes-soil.htm

Cincinnati’s urban farmers cross-pollinate nutrition, community to grow sustainable neighborhoods

CINCINNATI — Domonique Peebles grew up in Louisville, Kentucky growing food in his backyard, taking what he and his family couldn’t eat themselves and giving to his neighbors and family friends.

“We would always grow more than we could actually eat,” he said. “I asked my dad one time, ‘Why do we do this?’ and he said, you know, ‘You get to go home and eat every night, but that doesn’t mean the people you live next to get to do that.’

“That’s just something that’s always stuck with me.”

When Peebles moved to Over-the-Rhine in 2011, he found himself continuing that tradition.

“I lived between two Kroger buildings,” he said, one on Vine Street in OTR and the other in nearby Walnut Hills, but it didn’t take long for both of those grocery stores to shutter.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.wcpo.com/news/transportation-development/move-up-cincinnati/cincinnatis-urban-farmers-cross-pollinate-nutrition-empowerment-to-grow-sustainable-communities

Urban Agriculture is Dead! Cities have One, Two, Three…Many Urban Agricultures!

When Socrates, Plato, and the gang hung out at the farmers market in downtown Athens, they argued a lot about the essence of beauty, truth, and justice.

They had no idea of the problems they would create for urban agriculture 2500 years later.

Ancient Greece, a major tributary to western culture, was obsessed with absolute and universal Truth — that’s Truth with a capital T and in the singular.

This singular (academics call it “essentialist”) legacy lives on in today’s thinking about food. Think of such commonly used expressions as food policy, food strategy, food culture, local food, sustainable food, alternative food, and urban agriculture. Not much pluralism, plurals or variation here!!

We betray the Greek origin of western styles of thinking every time we use the singular to discuss the opposite — the sheer abundance and bounty of foods and food choices that modern living and technologies offer.

READ MORE:

Urban Agriculture is Dead! Cities have One, Two, Three…Many Urban Agricultures!

Heroes Center wants its urban agriculture to benefit veterans and the whole community

Paula Sieber can see long into the future and well beyond the dingy white cabins that hug the trees at the Heroes Center Veterans Support Camp.

She sees an urban farm that grows up to 100,000 pounds of fruits, vegetables and eggs a year for veterans, community customers and people who can’t afford or can’t find the finest produce.

She sees a place where veterans can learn job skills, from solar-power installation to hydroponic agriculture.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.greensboro.com/news/local_news/high-point-s-heroes-center-wants-its-urban-agriculture-to/article_504c29a7-8fa1-5fce-bdd0-37b242348e92.html