Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

Most people out there are now aware of the meaning of holistic lawn care and holistic weed control, nonetheless, for the few ones who may still find it a bit difficult to understand, holistic weed control is the control of weed organically, naturally or without the use of any harmful chemicals. Organic weed control comes with a number of benefits which include the safety of the household and the environment as a whole.

Holistic lawn care is quickly growing into a trend for big companies and home owners who are beginning to understand the repercussions of using chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Tests have continued to show that chemicals have dire consequences. These chemicals are harmful to our children, our pets and the environment as a whole especially when used for long periods of time. Continue reading Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

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Neighbors complain about Florida man doing yard work naked, police say it is legal


“WASHINGTON (Circa) — Neighbors in Stuart, Florida, are irritated with their fellow resident who has been doing yard work in the nude.

“I came out Sunday night to put the trash out, and I look over and he is bent over, winding up his hose, and I’m like that is my view of the neighborhood,” Melissa Ny, a neighbor, told WPBF-TV. “He works on his car, and he does it naked and everyone has called the police, he is just out there doing his yard work, whatever he needs to do outside, naked.”

Another neighbor believes the man should have some respect for children who live in the area.”

READ THE FULL STORY AT: “WearTV.com

Fall Planting Schedule, Down To Your First Frost Date

 

 

Now is the time to start making solid plans for your fall and winter garden. Follow this simple planting schedule for a great start, or visit our online interactive planting calendar for a more detailed description of what you should be planting when based on your exact location and grow zone. 
 

 

12-14 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Snap Beans, Cucumbers, Summer Squash, Parsnips, Rutabagas, Cilantro, Lettuce & Radishes.
 

 

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10-12 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Set Out Starts: Broccoli, Brussels, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Celery, Fennel and Parsley.
 

 

 

 

Direct Sow: Beets, Carrots, Collards, Leeks, Scallions, Lettuce, Radish, Peas, and Potatoes.
 

 

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8-10 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Arugula, Cabbage, Lettuce, Turnips, Spinach, Mustard, Bok Choy & Radishes.
 

 

 

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6-8 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Spinach, Mache & Lettuce.
 

 


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ON or AROUND Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Garlic, Shallots, & Onions.
 

 

Try our Online Planting Calendar, HERE

Fall Planting Schedule, Down To Your First Frost Date

 

 

Now is the time to start making solid plans for your fall and winter garden. Follow this simple planting schedule for a great start, or visit our online interactive planting calendar for a more detailed description of what you should be planting when based on your exact location and grow zone. 
 

 

12-14 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Snap Beans, Cucumbers, Summer Squash, Parsnips, Rutabagas, Cilantro, Lettuce & Radishes.
 

 

———————————
 

 

10-12 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Set Out Starts: Broccoli, Brussels, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Celery, Fennel and Parsley.
 

 

 

 

Direct Sow: Beets, Carrots, Collards, Leeks, Scallions, Lettuce, Radish, Peas, and Potatoes.
 

 

———————————
 

 

8-10 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Arugula, Cabbage, Lettuce, Turnips, Spinach, Mustard, Bok Choy & Radishes.
 

 

 

———————————
 

 

6-8 Weeks Before Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Spinach, Mache & Lettuce.
 

 


———————————
 

 

 

ON or AROUND Your First Frost Date

 

 

Direct Sow: Garlic, Shallots, & Onions.
 

 

Try our Online Planting Calendar, HERE

Farm-to-School students make first visit to Urban Farm

“The Farm-to-School program entered another phase this week with visits to the Urban Farm.

The program, a partnership between the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture and Columbia Public Schools, targets third- and fifth-graders at Alpha Hart Lewis, Battle, Benton STEM, Blue Ridge, Derby Ridge, New Haven, West Boulevard and Parkade elementary schools. They were chosen because of the high number of students receiving free and reduced-price meals. CCUA has received a $41,784 grant from the Boone County Children’s Services Fund, with a match of $31,700 from the school district. It’s a two-year grant.

Charity Keith has started as the Farm-to-School coordinator for the program and already has made initial visits to the schools.

“It’s a very busy schedule,” Keith said about the field trips to the farm.”

Read the FULL STORY at: “ColumbiaTribune.com

Sacramento Is Making Urban Agriculture a Way of Life

“As the food movement gains strength and farm-to-fork practices become increasingly popular, many cities across the United States are investing in urban agriculture, both to attract tourists and to improve community health. For example, in Detroit, which The Washington Post has dubbed a “food mecca,” advocates are using urban farms and community gardens to help ease food insecurity. And, in Boston, legislation to make urban farming easier has contributed to the city’s reputation as a “haven for organic food” and helped make local produce more available to low-income residents.

Yet few places have been more vocal in their efforts to expand urban agriculture as Sacramento, California. In fact, if you Google “farm to fork,” the top result will take you to a website about Sacramento’s initiatives to support local food.

“Farm-to-Fork isn’t a passing fad or a marketing slogan in the Sacramento region—it’s the way we live,” the website explains, noting that the area’s ideal climate, ability to grow food year-round, and 1.5 million acres of active farmland make it an agricultural leader nationally and globally.”

Read the FULL STORY at: “CivilEats.com

Sustainable Missoula: Gardens help Missoula’s Native American population get healthy

“Sitting on top of a small asphalt parking lot at 830 W. Central Ave., you can find 12 cedar wood raised garden boxes.

The boxes are surrounded by a wooden post-and-cinder block fence to separate it from the rest of the parking lot.

During the summer, you will see most garden staples that tend to do well in Montana, such as onions, carrots, tomatoes, peppers, beets, kale and others, growing vibrantly.

This is the Missoula Urban Indian Health Center (MUIHC) Community Garden.”

View the Original Story at: “MissoulaCurrent.com

Want to have a fall veggie garden? Start planting these now!

“Most of us think of spring as gardening season, but fall provides a terrific opportunity for another harvest. Squash, beans and even potatoes can be planted over the coming weeks, along with other vegetables.

Alas, it’s too late for tomatoes. They should have been planted back in July. (But I planted some in mid-September once and had the best fall harvest ever.) And it’s probably a little early for cool weather plants like lettuce.”

When to plant

“When to plant depends on where you live and your inclination. Some like to brave the hot end of summer, hoping for early harvests. Others are willing to risk waiting for cooler days and count on a late frost.”

Most Popular Seeds to Plant for a Fall/Winter Harvest:

Arugula: Arugula seeds

Beans (Bush): Bean seeds

Beets: Beet seeds

Mustard Greens: Mustard seeds

Broccoli: Broccoli seeds

Cabbage: Cabbage seeds

Cauliflower: Cauliflower seeds

Chard: Chard seeds

Chicory: Chicory seeds

Cilantro: Cilantro seeds

Collards: Collard seeds

Radish: Radish seeds

Dill: Dill seeds

Kale: Kale seeds

Lettuce: Lettuce seeds

Peas: Pea seeds

Scallions: Scallion seeds

Spinach: Spinach seeds

Turnip: Turnip seeds

NEW PRODUCT!  All-in-One Fall/Winter Seed Bank

Read the FULL article at: “DallasNews.com”

Fall is time to convert to no-till gardening

“I often hear from vegetable or flower gardeners who are unhappy with their soil quality. They routinely incorporate organic matter in the soil each fall, but are still disappointed with their heavy soil. Why aren’t they developing beautiful crumbly dark brown soil that’s easy to plant and great for vegetable root crops?

Routinely tilling your garden soil each fall and spring could be the culprit.

USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service encourages building soil health and protecting soil organisms, through:

• keeping the soil covered as much as possible

• disturbing soil as little as possible

• keeping plants growing throughout the year to feed the soil, and

• diversifying plant material through crop rotation.

Learn more about converting to a “NO-TILL” garden at: “JournalStar.com”

RICHMOND, VA – “Toxic Air in Urban Veggie Gardens”

“Many city dwellers take nutrition matters into their own hands through Urban gardening. But is urban air good for our garden veggies? Of course, water, air and soil are key foundations of plant life. But what happens when metals in the form of gases and particulate matters are added ingredients? Ahkinyala Cobb-Abdullah, PhD would like to explore that topic with you over a sip of some sort at the next Science Pub RVA: Toxic Air in Urban Veggie Gardens. How is this subject studied and what does the research tell us? Learn about the interactions of urban air, plants, and the impact on the produce on our plates while hanging out with other curious minds on Monday, September 17th at The Hof.

Get more information about this event at: “IdeaStations.org

Local food advocates work to bring more urban farms to Northern Nevada

“RENO, Nev. — At Brenton Aikin and Kass Freitas’ home in Midtown Reno, neat rows of kale, salad greens, and baby root vegetables cover the entire front yard. Out back, a greenhouse covers a variety of cherry tomatoes climbing up trellises.

The couple’s crops are not just for personal consumption. It’s their first season producing as Ital Farms, a state-registered urban farm — and an example of what local food advocates hope will be a growing trend in Northern Nevada.

Aikin and Freitas are farming on less than a quarter acre of land, including another residential plot they lease a few minutes from their house. This first season, Aikin estimates they grew 500-600 pounds of salad greens and roughly 400 pounds each of carrots, turnips, and radishes.”

READ THE FULL STORY AT: “NNBusinessView.com