Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

Most people out there are now aware of the meaning of holistic lawn care and holistic weed control, nonetheless, for the few ones who may still find it a bit difficult to understand, holistic weed control is the control of weed organically, naturally or without the use of any harmful chemicals. Organic weed control comes with a number of benefits which include the safety of the household and the environment as a whole.

Holistic lawn care is quickly growing into a trend for big companies and home owners who are beginning to understand the repercussions of using chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Tests have continued to show that chemicals have dire consequences. These chemicals are harmful to our children, our pets and the environment as a whole especially when used for long periods of time. Continue reading Holistic, Organic and Natural Lawn Care

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Why Fall Gardens Need Compost And Amendments

LA TIMES – So you likely spent a bundle on preparing your first victory garden last spring, with organic potting soils, compost and manures. Why should you have to go out to buy more for your cool-weather garden this fall?

Because the veggies you planted last spring devoured those beneficial microbes, said master gardener Yvonne Savio, creator of GardeningInLA.net, and your depleted soil needs another jolt to feed the greens and other goodies you want to grow this fall.

“The plants you grew this summer sucked up the energy and nutrition you put in your soil, just like it sucked up the moisture you put in the ground,” Savio said. “It’s like asking, ‘I ate dinner last Sunday. Why should I have dinner again this Sunday?’”

Like most garden experts, Savio preaches the benefits of feeding your soil, not your plants. In other words, forget about fertilizers and concentrate on building healthy, nutrient-rich soil.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.latimes.com/lifestyle/story/2020-10-01/why-fall-gardens-need-compost-amendments

Grow Food, De-stress: Rooted Offers Corporate Employees Micro-Learning Urban Farming Platform

GreenQueen.com – Agtech startup Rooted wants to make urban farming the new corporate hobby with its new micro-learning platform, which offers users the tools and skills they need to grow their own food at home. Launched amid the coronavirus pandemic at the agri-food conference Future Food Asia 2020, which has led most of us to rethink food safety and health, the first-of-its-kind global farming hub will offer bite-sized and interactive information with input from farming experts so corporates can engage their employees to cultivate fresh produce at their own pace.

“We realized people were weary of endless webinars and Zoom meetings, we wanted to create something bite-sized and interactive,” said Nicola Kerslake, co-founder of Contain Inc.

Isabelle Decitre, the co-founder of ID Capital, added that because Rooted is designed for all individuals, it makes it the perfect platform for corporate wellness and sustainability programs to engage workforces in activities that are particularly pertinent to the global issues of today – health and the environment. 

“Farming is a fantastic way to bring together employees in a positive project. With Rooted we are pioneering new, social, ways of learning,” Decitre explains.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.greenqueen.com.hk/grow-food-de-stress-rooted-offers-corporate-employees-micro-learning-urban-farming-platform/

Grow Food, De-stress: Rooted Offers Corporate Employees Micro-Learning Urban Farming Platform

GreenQueen.com – Agtech startup Rooted wants to make urban farming the new corporate hobby with its new micro-learning platform, which offers users the tools and skills they need to grow their own food at home. Launched amid the coronavirus pandemic at the agri-food conference Future Food Asia 2020, which has led most of us to rethink food safety and health, the first-of-its-kind global farming hub will offer bite-sized and interactive information with input from farming experts so corporates can engage their employees to cultivate fresh produce at their own pace.

“We realized people were weary of endless webinars and Zoom meetings, we wanted to create something bite-sized and interactive,” said Nicola Kerslake, co-founder of Contain Inc.

Isabelle Decitre, the co-founder of ID Capital, added that because Rooted is designed for all individuals, it makes it the perfect platform for corporate wellness and sustainability programs to engage workforces in activities that are particularly pertinent to the global issues of today – health and the environment. 

“Farming is a fantastic way to bring together employees in a positive project. With Rooted we are pioneering new, social, ways of learning,” Decitre explains.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.greenqueen.com.hk/grow-food-de-stress-rooted-offers-corporate-employees-micro-learning-urban-farming-platform/

10 Influencers and Instagram Accounts to Follow for Gardening Advice

We don’t just turn to Instagram to stalk our favorite celebrities and social influencers to find out what they’re wearing, eating or where they hang out. Instagram also has a bevy of great accounts that celebrate and share knowledge about the dirty but glorious world of gardening.

So, for those who’ve started to dabble in urban gardening during the pandemic lockdowns, we’ve rounded up a list of 10 gardening accounts to provide you with the ultimate inspiration for plant cultivation. You’re welcome!

FOLLOW THESE TOP 10 INFLUENCERS NOW: https://ecowarriorprincess.net/2020/09/10-influencers-instagram-accounts-gardening-advice/

10 Influencers and Instagram Accounts to Follow for Gardening Advice

We don’t just turn to Instagram to stalk our favorite celebrities and social influencers to find out what they’re wearing, eating or where they hang out. Instagram also has a bevy of great accounts that celebrate and share knowledge about the dirty but glorious world of gardening.

So, for those who’ve started to dabble in urban gardening during the pandemic lockdowns, we’ve rounded up a list of 10 gardening accounts to provide you with the ultimate inspiration for plant cultivation. You’re welcome!

FOLLOW THESE TOP 10 INFLUENCERS NOW: https://ecowarriorprincess.net/2020/09/10-influencers-instagram-accounts-gardening-advice/

Urban farm grows fresh produce and sense of community

Post Register: Claudia Pine spent Wednesday morning at Happyville Farm digging up carrots, picking tomatoes and washing cucumbers. By the time she was done, Pine had 58 pounds of fresh vegetables that were separated into one-pound bunches. Each family who visited the Community Food Basket – Idaho Falls that day was given one.

“Fresh, farm-raised produce is good for you. We are trying to provide people with the most nutritional food we can. People can then incorporate this fresh produce into their packaged food to help them go farther and make those meals healthier,” Ariel Jackson, executive director of the Community Food Basket – Idaho Falls.

Happyville Farm is a large garden just over one acre in size tucked into a neighborhood west of downtown at 600 S. Saturn Avenue. The farm is an offshoot of the Community Food Basket that Food Basket volunteer Pine dreamed up six years ago. This autumn she is reaping her first harvest.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.postregister.com/news/local/urban-farm-grows-fresh-produce-and-sense-of-community/article_4679d34e-4832-5b8f-98ed-667a2d5d2193.html

Tomato Seed Saving Tips and Tricks

Saving tomato seeds is a popular tradition amongst most gardeners. They take their most prolific plants, and favorite varieties and pay special attention to harvesting seed for the following year.

Hybrid vs. Heirloom and why it matters: Hybrid plants are a combination of two different sets of genetic material. If a hybrid tries to mate with another plant, even another plant of the same hybrid type, it may not be able to produce any fruit at all and will usually fail to show the desired characteristics of the mother plants. For example, if a large-fruited, disease-resistant tomato plant were allowed to mate with another similar plant, the offspring might have small fruits and lack disease resistance – the benefits of creating the hybrid, to begin with, would have disappeared in producing the next generation.

Heirloom varieties have been passed down from generation to generation and have stabilized over time. They will produce fruit true-to-type, like that of that plant it came from. Repeat variety and quality can be expected as long as you avoid any cross-pollination. Learn MORE About Hybrid vs. Heirloom Plants

There are several ways that you can save your heirloom tomato seeds, but here are two of the most popular techniques. 

Fermentation Method:

  1. Choose a beautiful, healthy fruit that is slightly over-ripe.
  2. Slice open.
  3. Gently squeeze seeds into a cup.
  4. Add a small amount of water, just enough to cover the seeds.
  5. Cover the cup with a kitchen towel and make sure they don’t dry out. Let ferment for 3-7 days. (Mold will begin to grow, this is normal and expected.)
  6. Rinse well, and allow to fully dry on a paper towel.
  7. Store in a cool, dry place such as an airtight bag or seed vault.

Non-Fermentation Method:

  1. Choose a beautiful, healthy fruit that is slightly over-ripe.
  2. Slice open.
  3. Gently squeeze seeds onto a paper towel.
  4. Let fully dry for about 1 week.
  5. Store in a cool, dry place such as an airtight bag or seed vault.

 

 

Tomato Seed Saving Tips and Tricks

Saving tomato seeds is a popular tradition amongst most gardeners. They take their most prolific plants, and favorite varieties and pay special attention to harvesting seed for the following year.

Hybrid vs. Heirloom and why it matters: Hybrid plants are a combination of two different sets of genetic material. If a hybrid tries to mate with another plant, even another plant of the same hybrid type, it may not be able to produce any fruit at all and will usually fail to show the desired characteristics of the mother plants. For example, if a large-fruited, disease-resistant tomato plant were allowed to mate with another similar plant, the offspring might have small fruits and lack disease resistance – the benefits of creating the hybrid, to begin with, would have disappeared in producing the next generation.

Heirloom varieties have been passed down from generation to generation and have stabilized over time. They will produce fruit true-to-type, like that of that plant it came from. Repeat variety and quality can be expected as long as you avoid any cross-pollination. Learn MORE About Hybrid vs. Heirloom Plants

There are several ways that you can save your heirloom tomato seeds, but here are two of the most popular techniques. 

Fermentation Method:

  1. Choose a beautiful, healthy fruit that is slightly over-ripe.
  2. Slice open.
  3. Gently squeeze seeds into a cup.
  4. Add a small amount of water, just enough to cover the seeds.
  5. Cover the cup with a kitchen towel and make sure they don’t dry out. Let ferment for 3-7 days. (Mold will begin to grow, this is normal and expected.)
  6. Rinse well, and allow to fully dry on a paper towel.
  7. Store in a cool, dry place such as an airtight bag or seed vault.

Non-Fermentation Method:

  1. Choose a beautiful, healthy fruit that is slightly over-ripe.
  2. Slice open.
  3. Gently squeeze seeds onto a paper towel.
  4. Let fully dry for about 1 week.
  5. Store in a cool, dry place such as an airtight bag or seed vault.

 

 

Can small pieces of land bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed.

Michael Sears

JSOnline: An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a central city site northwest of downtown Milwaukee.

It would be developed on a 9,000-square-foot vacant lot, south of West Walnut Street between North 14th Lane and North 15th Street, by Venus Consulting LLC, according to a new Common Council resolution.

That resolution calls for selling the city-owned lot for $1 to Venus Consulting, which a Department of City Development report describes as community advocacy, activism, and education organization.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.jsonline.com/story/money/real-estate/commercial/2020/09/28/milwaukee-urban-garden-community-education-center-proposed-central-city/3559624001/

Can small pieces of land bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed.

Michael Sears

JSOnline: An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a central city site northwest of downtown Milwaukee.

It would be developed on a 9,000-square-foot vacant lot, south of West Walnut Street between North 14th Lane and North 15th Street, by Venus Consulting LLC, according to a new Common Council resolution.

That resolution calls for selling the city-owned lot for $1 to Venus Consulting, which a Department of City Development report describes as community advocacy, activism, and education organization.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.jsonline.com/story/money/real-estate/commercial/2020/09/28/milwaukee-urban-garden-community-education-center-proposed-central-city/3559624001/