Gardening at Badger Rock lets students earn money, socialize during COVID-19 pandemic

ANDY MANIS, FOR THE STATE JOURNAL

Madison.com – Gardens are a source of income and a social oasis for high school students this fall.

“I was looking for a job that would be part-time and would be safe during the pandemic, so I wanted to work somewhere outside and I’ve always loved gardens,” said Evfrosiniia “Frosya” Mozhaeva, a sophomore at West High School.

She said she enjoys working with others in the gardens at Badger Rock Neighborhood Center, and it feels safe partly because the number of people working at one time is limited.

Sophomore Malik McDonald said he was drawn to a jo at the garden because a friend is also working there, it is something to do during the pandemic and he lives nearby.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://madison.com/wsj/news/local/education/local_schools/gardening-at-badger-rock-lets-students-earn-money-socialize-during-covid-19-pandemic/article_417fa38a-5139-577e-a8bc-86261ab2c941.html

Gardening at Badger Rock lets students earn money, socialize during COVID-19 pandemic

ANDY MANIS, FOR THE STATE JOURNAL

Madison.com – Gardens are a source of income and a social oasis for high school students this fall.

“I was looking for a job that would be part-time and would be safe during the pandemic, so I wanted to work somewhere outside and I’ve always loved gardens,” said Evfrosiniia “Frosya” Mozhaeva, a sophomore at West High School.

She said she enjoys working with others in the gardens at Badger Rock Neighborhood Center, and it feels safe partly because the number of people working at one time is limited.

Sophomore Malik McDonald said he was drawn to a jo at the garden because a friend is also working there, it is something to do during the pandemic and he lives nearby.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://madison.com/wsj/news/local/education/local_schools/gardening-at-badger-rock-lets-students-earn-money-socialize-during-covid-19-pandemic/article_417fa38a-5139-577e-a8bc-86261ab2c941.html

Thousands chasing London allotments as supply dwindles

Hayley Dunning – The mental, physical and community benefits of allotment gardening are invaluable to city dwellers, but allotments are in short supply in London.

This is one of the conclusions of a new paper by Imperial College London researchers in the Centre for Environmental Policy, published in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. MSc student Ellen Fletcher and Dr Tilly Collins assessed allotment supply and demand in London, finding plots are shrinking while tens of thousands of people remain on waiting lists.

Forty-one London sites have closed completely in the past seven years and with over 30,000 people now estimated to be on waiting lists, there is on average a delay of four to five years before receiving a plot. To try and meet this demand the number of individual plots has been increased as surrendered plots are often now split into ever-smaller units.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/204133/thousands-chasing-london-allotments-supply-dwindles/

Urban gardening just got a whole lot easier and more sustainable

Vogue.com.au – How many dead plants are you responsible for? How many green-tinged dreams of becoming an amalgamation of Martha Stewart and Gwyneth Paltrow have ended in sad, withered herbs on your windowsill?

If you see yourself here and have minor amounts of regret or PTSD from killing plant after plant but still want to grow and garden, we may have just stumbled on the solution for you. Urban gardening is on the rise, as our homes are getting smaller and cities fuller, there’s still the urge to surround ourselves with greenery, especially if that greenery is ripe for eating. And Queensland-based Airgarden wants to help you do just that, by growing and gardening with their vertical, aeroponic garden.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.vogue.com.au/vogue-living/design/calling-all-green-thumbs-urban-gardening-just-got-a-whole-lot-easier-and-more-sustainable/image-gallery/202bc517e73c8cf6a5de1a8880a81d5c

Living Sustainably: Put nature to work for more effective gardening

HollandSentinel.com – The urban environment is dominated by buildings, pavement, lawns, and other non-natural elements. We constantly struggle against nature to maintain our built environment, especially our lawns and gardens.

This can include the use of fertilizers and pesticides that, if used improperly, can cause environmental harm. Our built landscapes can also be very water intensive, which can lead to high demand on our public water utilities.

However, there are ways to work with nature to create an attractive, low maintenance landscape that will help protect the environment, conserve water and provide places for urban wildlife.

Gardening with nature starts with careful planning. Take an inventory of what you already have.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.hollandsentinel.com/news/20200914/living-sustainably-put-nature-to-work-for-more-effective-gardening

Purdue Extension: Growing communities one garden at a time

AGPURDUE.EDU – Located within an Indianapolis food desert, 25 volunteers gathered on a hot July day to build six raised garden beds and plant cool-season vegetable crops in a community garden on the campus of HealthNet Martindale-Brightwood Health Center. The volunteers made a vision for quality food access a reality sought by determined HealthNet employees, Martindale-Brightwood residents and the help of Purdue Extension.

HealthNet is one of Indiana’s largest Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) with a network of nine community-based primary care health centers in Indianapolis and Bloomington, Ind. HealthNet provides health care services to the medically underserved, reaching more than 61,000 residents each year. The health center in the Martindale-Brightwood area serves residents with the highest poverty rate in Marion County who also happen to live in a food desert, meaning access to affordable or good-quality fresh food is severely limited.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://ag.purdue.edu/stories/purdue-extension-growing-communities-one-garden-at-a-time/

Santa Rosa is a top spot for gardening in the US

PressDemocrat.com – If you like gardening, Santa Rosa is one of the best places in the country to be.

That’s the conclusion of a new nationwide survey that ranked Santa Rosa fourth in the nation for urban gardening. LawnStarter, an Austin, Texas-based lawn care company, compared 150 of the most populated cities in the U.S. for a variety of factors, including the number of garden clubs, community gardens and nurseries and the number of days of sunshine and length of the growing season.

Santa Rosa’s good scores placed it in the top tier, outranked only by three cities in The Sunshine State — Miami, Orlando and Tampa, Florida.

When it comes to the number of nurseries and garden centers per 100,000 residents, only Miami and Salem, Oregon, have better shopping opportunities for the green thumb crowd.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/lifestyle/santa-rosa-is-a-top-spot-for-gardening-in-the-us/

An urban homestead that nurtures, nourishes educates

Julie Pritchard Wright’s San Rafael urban homestead is home to vegetables, fruits, flowers and chickens. (Photo by Julie P. Wright)

Julie Pritchard Wright grew up on her family’s two-acre property in the hills of Cupertino, where her father grew grapes and fruit trees, and kept bees and sometimes chickens, while her mother tended a large vegetable garden.

“Whenever I smell the scent of tomato leaves, I think of her,” Wright says. “She also grew many kinds of flowers, and I grow many of the same varieties.”

Wright considers her own 5,000-square-foot San Rafael garden as an “urban homestead” where she can cultivate a sustainable, organic and “locavore” lifestyle, and nurture plants that, in return, nurture her and teach her patience, observation and mindfulness.

In keeping with her lifestyle, Wright likes to line-dry her laundry, can and ferment her own foods, host sausage- or salami-making gatherings, practice no-till gardening and some permaculture principles, and plans to eventually replace her lawn with edibles and exchanges her homegrown produce with Marin neighbors at the San Anselmo Garden Exchange.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE: https://www.marinij.com/2020/09/11/an-urban-homestead-that-nurtures-nourishes-educates/

Prep now for the veggie garden with a mix of transitional and cool-season plants

NOLA.com – When it comes to vegetable gardening, understanding the seasons and the proper time to plant various crops is so important to success. Although it certainly doesn’t feel like it, we are gradually transitioning into fall — and that affects what we can plant.

Cool fronts may begin to make their way into our area this month, bringing welcome relief from the heat. Still, daytime highs regularly reach the 80s and 90s well into October. During this transition period, warm- and cool-season vegetables rub elbows in the garden.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.nola.com/entertainment_life/home_garden/article_9b5e1e60-f177-11ea-9de3-176c3d5c2ceb.html

Dj Cavem drops beets for a healthy future

Dj Cavem Moetavation (Ietef Vitae) is all about seeds. He plants seeds in the soil to grow healthy food, sure, but he also plants the seeds of lifestyle change in kids. For him, these efforts are one and the same: they both hold the power to “sprout that life”—that life being a culture of wellness, for people and for the earth. He’s an urban grower, plant-based chef, educator, musician, and activist dedicated to healthier communities.

While he’s never been more certain that true success is health, that belief took lots of TLC. He grew up in the Five Points district of Denver, a historically Black neighborhood where processed food was wealth. You were cool if you came to school with a Big Mac, but kale? Not so much.

Ietef was raised to see this differently. With an artist-activist mother, he spent time as a kid around family and community elders who grew food. He considers himself lucky, because most of his peers didn’t get a chance to experience this kind of urban gardening at a young age—he recalls planting his first apricot tree at age three. He saw lines of folks waiting for government-assisted processed food at churches, but he also remembers eating pears, peaches, and watermelons from out of a neighbor’s pick-up truck.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://stonepierpress.org/goodfoodnews/djcavemecohiphop